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MYTHICAL CREATURES A-Z
Dog works at airport
Bicycle Powered Tree House Elevator
Tunnel Of Lights
Car-Free City: China Builds Dense Metropolis from
Preserve fresh herbs by freezing them
1970's bunker
Girl convinces kidnapper to use cell phone
An apple a day could keep obesity away
The Man who saved the world
Scientists believe that the hydra may immortal
Psych2go
Alternatives for overused words
salmonella's Achille's Heal
Sequencing electric eel genome unlocks shocking se
New ‘lab-on-a-chip’ could revolutionize early diag
LEDs: Good for prizes, bad for insects By Erik Sto
Past measurements may have missed massive ocean wa
Blue Dragon
Sleepy Hallucinations
Gluing chromosomes at the right place
Scientists link to Immortality
Interesting Facts
Night owls are linked to high income earners
Alternatives for overused words
Google
Massive ocean warming
Ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria
Awesome Swingsets
Gene Swapping
Great to Know!!!
Chlamydia Treatment: STD Fact
A street cat named bob
Ultra Fact
Sea Sapphire
Awesome Truck
Man hires hitman to kill his wife
Arizona Biker Gang helps child abuse victims
Liquid salts treat skin infections
Narrownose Chimaera
Extreme home
Blood Testing for Ebola
Scientists grow human stomachs
Ultra Facts
Sugar Gliders
Western Europes tallest building
Today is a gift
Piano Projections help you play a tune
Sleep boosts brain cell numbers
Vaccine-resistant polio strain discovered
"Smart bomb" new antibiotic
Albino Raven
The high life tree house
Biology Today
Biology Today
Biology Today
Homeless Youth
Now man can fly
Gut–brain link grabs neuroscientists (Nature News)
The starry night
Cancer Medication News
In Life Page 2
Dog works at airport
Dog Works at Airport Returning Passenger’s Lost Items
Bicycle Powered Tree House Elevator
Bicycle Powered Tree House Elevator
Tunnel Of Lights
Tunnel of lights 
Car-Free City: China Builds Dense Metropolis from
China Carless City 1

Altering most of today’s cities to eliminate cars altogether would be a daunting, if not impossible, proposition – which is why China is starting from scratch. Great City will be built around a high-rise core housing 80,000 people, entirely walkable, and surrounded by green space.


China Carless City 2

Planned for a rural area outside Chengdu, the high-density Great City will give residents access to a ‘buffer area’ of gardens and greenery making up 60% of the total area of the city. Walking from the center of the city to the green spaces takes just ten minutes, and other nearby urban centers will be accessible by a mass transit system.


China Carless City 3

Chicago architecture firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture say the city will use 48% less energy and 58% less water than a more conventional city of the same size; it will also produce 89% less landfill waste and generate 60% less carbon dioxide.


China Carless City 4


The development addresses the problem of overpopulation, pollution and urban sprawl by compacting a lot of residents into vertical housing, growing food nearby. “The design is attempting to address some of the most pressing urban issues of our time, including the need for sustainable, dense urban living at a cost people can afford,” says Gill.


Carless City China 5



“Accordingly, we’ve designed this project as a dense vertical city that acknowledges and in fact embraces the surrounding landscape—a city whose residents will live in harmony with nature rather than in opposition to it. Great City will demonstrate that high-density living doesn’t have to be polluted and alienated from nature. Everything within the built environment of Great City is considered to enhance the quality of life of its residents. Quite simply, it offers a great place to live, work and raise a family.”

 
Preserve fresh herbs by freezing them
Preserve fresh herbs by freezing them with olive oil in an ice tray. When you’re ready to use them, simply drop cubes in a hot pan, and get cooking!
1970's bunker






Girl convinces kidnapper to use cell phone
Girl convinces kidnapper to use cell phone

She started to talk to him about his interests and her kidnapper began to view her as a person he could trust. Eventually, he declared that he was in love with her. After 10 days of captivity, he allowed Elizabeth to borrow his cell phone to play games on it. Naturally, when he left, she used it to call her mother.

 

This is actually a smart thing to do. If you are ever kidnapped, you should try to humanize yourself & get close to your captors. Do not challenge them, rather try to show them that you are worthy of their respect. If you speak the same language, try to talk with them and exchange information. Learn about them and let them learn about you. Try to relate to them.  Family could be a safe topic depending on the situation. If they see you as a person, your quality of life as a captive and your probability of survival go way up. This creates the reverse-Stockholm Syndrome on them in which they can express empathy and sympathy and have positive feelings towards you. Now you might have the opportunity to escape like the girl above did!

 

An apple a day could keep obesity away

 

An apple a day could keep obesity away

 

Scientists at Washington State University have concluded that nondigestible compounds in apples – specifically, Granny Smith apples – may help prevent disorders associated with obesity. The study, thought to be the first to assess these compounds in apple cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest, appears in October’s print edition of the journal Food Chemistry.

 

"We know that, in general, apples are a good source of these nondigestible compounds but there are differences in varieties," said food scientist Giuliana Noratto, the study’s lead researcher. "Results from this study will help consumers to discriminate between apple varieties that can aid in the fight against obesity."

The tart green Granny Smith apples benefit the growth of friendly bacteria in the colon due to their high content of non-digestible compounds, including dietary fiber and polyphenols, and low content of available carbohydrates. Despite being subjected to chewing, stomach acid and digestive enzymes, these compounds remain intact when they reach the colon. Once there, they are fermented by bacteria in the colon, which benefits the growth of friendly bacteria in the gut.


 

PULLMAN, Wash. - Scientists at Washington State University have concluded that nondigestible compounds in apples - specifically, Granny Smith apples - may help prevent disorders associated with obesity. The study, thought to be the first to assess these compounds in apple cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest, appears in October's print edition of the journal Food Chemistry.

 

"We know that, in general, apples are a good source of these nondigestible compounds but there are differences in varieties," said food scientist Giuliana Noratto, the study's lead researcher. "Results from this study will help consumers to discriminate between apple varieties that can aid in the fight against obesity."

 

The tart green Granny Smith apples benefit the growth of friendly bacteria in the colon due to their high content of non-digestible compounds, including dietary fiber and polyphenols, and low content of available carbohydrates. Despite being subjected to chewing, stomach acid and digestive enzymes, these compounds remain intact when they reach the colon. Once there, they are fermented by bacteria in the colon, which benefits the growth of friendly bacteria in the gut.

 

The study showed that Granny Smith apples surpass Braeburn, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, McIntosh and Red Delicious in the amount of nondigestible compounds they contain.

 

"The nondigestible compounds in the Granny Smith apples actually changed the proportions of fecal bacteria from obese mice to be similar to that of lean mice," Noratto said.

 

The discovery could help prevent some of the disorders associated with obesity such as low-grade, chronic inflammation that can lead to diabetes. The balance of bacterial communities in the colon of obese people is disturbed. This results in microbial byproducts that lead to inflammation and influence metabolic disorders associated with obesity, Noratto said.

 

"What determines the balance of bacteria in our colon is the food we consume," she said.

 

Re-establishing a healthy balance of bacteria in the colon stabilizes metabolic processes that influence inflammation and the sensation of feeling satisfied, or satiety, she said.

The Man who saved the world



52 years ago, at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, second-in-command Vasilli Arkhipov of the Soviet submarine B-59 refused to agree with his Captain’s order to launch nuclear torpedos against US warships and setting off what might well have been a terminal superpower nuclear war.

 

The US had been dropping depth charges near the submarine in an attempt to force it to surface, unaware it was carrying nuclear arms. The Soviet officers, who had lost radio contact with Moscow, concluded that World War 3 had begun, and 2 of the officers agreed to ‘blast the warships out of the water’. Arkhipov refused to agree – unanimous consent of 3 officers was required and thanks to him, the world was saved from being scarred badly.

His story is finally being told the BBC is airing a documentary on it.

Scientists believe that the hydra may immortal
Scietists believe that the hydra may be immortal









You can learn more about this immortal animal in our latest video.
Psych2go
















Alternatives for overused words




salmonella's Achille's Heal


Salmonella’s Achilles’ Heel: Reliance on Single Food Source to Stay Potent

Scientists have identified a potential Achilles’ heel for Salmonella – the bacteria’s reliance on a single food source to remain fit in the inflamed intestine.

When these wily bugs can’t access this nutrient, they become 1,000 times less effective at sustaining disease than when they’re fully nourished.

The research suggests that blocking activation of one of five genes that transport the nutrient to Salmonella cells could be a new strategy to fight infection.

"For some reason, Salmonella really wants this nutrient, and if it can’t get this one, it’s in really bad shape,” said Brian Ahmer, associate professor of microbial infection and immunity at The Ohio State University and lead author of the study. “If you could block Salmonella from getting that nutrient, you’d really stop Salmonella.

“That was one of the big surprises: that there is only one nutrient source that is so important to Salmonella. For most bacteria, if we get rid of one nutrient acquisition system, they continue to grow on other nutrients,” Ahmer said. “In the gut, Salmonella can obtain hundreds of different nutrients. But without fructose-asparagine, it’s really unfit.”

Sequencing electric eel genome unlocks shocking se


Sequencing electric eel genome unlocks shocking secrets

The genome of the electric eel has recently been sequenced. This discovery has revealed the secret of how fishes with electric organs have evolved six times in the history of life to produce electricity outside of their bodies.

The research, published in the journal Science, sheds light on the genetic blueprint used to evolve these complex, novel organs. It was co-led by Michigan State University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Texas-Austin and the Systemix Institute.

“It’s truly exciting to find that complex structures like the electric organ, which evolved completely independently in six groups of fish, seem to share the same genetic toolkit,” said Jason Gallant, MSU zoologist and co-lead author of the paper. “Biologists are starting to learn, using genomics, that evolution makes similar structures from the same starting materials, even if the organisms aren’t even that closely related
 
New ‘lab-on-a-chip’ could revolutionize early diag


New ‘lab-on-a-chip’ could revolutionize early diagnosis of cancer

Scientists have been laboring to detect cancer and a host of other diseases in people using promising new biomarkers called “exosomes.”

"Exosomes are minuscule membrane vesicles — or sacs — released from most, if not all, cell types, including cancer cells," said Yong Zeng, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Kansas. "First described in the mid-’80s, they were once thought to be ‘cell dust,’ or trash bags containing unwanted cellular contents. However, in the past decade scientists realized that exosomes play important roles in many biological functions through capsuling and delivering molecular messages in the form of nucleic acids and proteins from the donor cells to affect the functions of nearby or distant cells. In other words, this forms a crucial pathway in which cells talk to others."

Zeng and colleagues from the University of Kansas Medical Center and KU Cancer Center have just published a breakthrough paper in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal describing their invention of a miniaturized biomedical testing device for exosomes. Dubbed the “lab-on-a-chip,” the device promises faster result times, reduced costs, minimal sample demands and better sensitivity of analysis when compared to the conventional bench-top instruments now used to examine the tiny biomarkers.

LEDs: Good for prizes, bad for insects By Erik Sto


LEDs: Good for prizes, bad for insects By

Past measurements may have missed massive ocean wa


Past measurements may have missed massive ocean warming

Earth’s oceans have absorbed more than 90% of the warming caused by greenhouse gases, researchers estimate, with the stored heat showing up as warmer seawater. But a new analysis suggests scientists may have underestimated the size of the heat sink in the upper ocean—which could have implications for researchers trying to understand the pace and scale of past warming.

Seas pose a formidable challenge to climate scientists. On one hand, they are as big a player in the global climate system as the atmosphere. As a result, “global warming is ocean warming,” oceanographer Gregory Johnson writes in a commentary on the new study, appearing in Nature Climate Change. But vast swaths of the ocean are poorly measured, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere.

Blue Dragon


















 

photos by mattsmith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 

despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 

the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures.

for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.

notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”

this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.

Sleepy Hallucinations


"Sleepy" hallucinations are also called hypnagogic imagery, referring to the transition state between awake and asleep. There are other types of “normal” hallucinations, too. Many mentally healthy people will hallucinate at some point in their lives. The whole subject is fascinating.

Gluing chromosomes at the right place



 

Gluing chromosomes at the right place

During cell division, chromosomes acquire a characteristic X-shape with the two DNA molecules (sister chromatids) linked at a central “connection region” that contains highly compacted DNA. It was unknown if rearrangements in this typical X-shape architecture could disrupt the correct separation of chromosomes. A recent study by Raquel Oliveira, from the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (Portugal), in collaboration with colleagues from the University of California, Santa Cruz (USA), now shows that the dislocation of particular DNA segments perturbs proper chromosome separation. The results of this study, published now in the open access journal PLOS Biology*, raise the possibility that chromosome rearrangements involving these regions, often seen in many cancers, can induce additional errors in cell division and thereby compromise genetic stability.

The key to understand this problem lies on the “glue” that keeps the two sister chromatids together. This gluing occurs by the action of proteins called cohesins that are usually enriched at the compact “connection region”. In this study, researchers monitored cell division in different strains of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster that carry chromosomes with misplaced sections of highly compacted DNA. Their results indicated that the inappropriate location of these chromosomal regions is sufficient to load the cohesion “glue”, leading to the formation of additional connections between sister-chromatids. As cell division proceeds and the sister chromatids are pulled to opposite poles of the cell, the presence of these extra cohesion sites leads to abnormal chromosome stretching as it is harder to “unglue” the chromatids.

Raquel Oliveira, first author of this study, explains: “Many cancer cells have these type of chromosomal abnormalities and we now show that this can bring additional problems every time a cell divides”. William Sullivan (UCSC), collaborator of this work, adds: “Like a car with its engine out of tune, over many cell divisions this is likely to result in severe disruptions in chromosome organization”.

 
Scientists link to Immortality


















Interesting Facts


















Night owls are linked to high income earners

Early to bed and early to rise won't make you wealthy and wise, research shows as night owls are linked to high income earners

 

The study also found that night owls' achievements at school was rated lower than that of larks, by about eight per cent - possibly because morning school timetables did not create the right conditions for them to learn




They are most likely to be healthy, wealthy and wise, according to the old adage.

But those who are early to bed and early to rise do not always have the upper hand, researchers say.

They have revealed that night owls are generally brighter and wealthier than those able to get up early in the morning.






Famous night owls: Winston Churchill, left, and Charles Darwin succeeded by being late to bed and to rise

The study also found that night owls' achievements at school was rated lower than that of larks, by about eight per cent - possibly because morning school timetables did not create the right conditions for them to learn

Experts from the University of Madrid carried out tests on around 1,000 teenagers and found that those who preferred to stay up late demonstrated the kind of intelligence associated with prestigious jobs and higher incomes.

Larks or ‘morning people’, however, often secured better exam results, possibly because lessons are held at the wrong time of day for night owls.

The researchers examined the habits and body clocks of the youngsters to determine whether they liked to stay up late and sleep in later in the morning, or preferred to go to bed early and were at their peak in the morning.



School performance and inductive intelligence, or problem solving, were measured and academic grades in the major subjects were also taken into account.

The results showed that evening types scored higher than morning types on inductive reasoning, which has been shown to be a good estimate of general intelligence and a strong indicator of academic performance.

They also had a greater capacity to think conceptually as well as analytically. Such abilities have been linked to innovative thinking, more prestigious occupations and better incomes.

Famous night owls include President Obama, Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, Keith Richards and Elvis Presley.

George W Bush, who is regularly in bed by 10pm, Thomas Edison, Napoleon, Condoleezza Rice, who wakes at 4.30am, and Ernest Hemingway are among those known as larks.

Jim Horne, professor of psychophysiology at Loughborough University, said: ‘Evening types tend to be the more extrovert creative types, the poets, artists and inventors, while the morning types are the deducers, as often seen with civil servants and accountants.’

A previous study of US Air Force recruits found evening types were much better at thinking laterally to solve problems than larks.


 

 

 


Alternatives for overused words




Google











Massive ocean warming

Past measurements may have missed massive ocean warming

Earth’s oceans have absorbed more than 90% of the warming caused by greenhouse gases, researchers estimate, with the stored heat showing up as warmer seawater. But a new analysis suggests scientists may have underestimated the size of the heat sink in the upper ocean—which could have implications for researchers trying to understand the pace and scale of past warming.

Seas pose a formidable challenge to climate scientists. On one hand, they are as big a player in the global climate system as the atmosphere. As a result, “global warming is ocean warming,” oceanographer Gregory Johnson writes in a commentary on the new study, appearing in Nature Climate Change. But vast swaths of the ocean are poorly measured, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere.



Ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’.

The prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

Awesome Swingsets


Gene Swapping

Gene-Swapping Plasmids Aid Antibiotic Resistance in Hospitals

Bacteria appear to be swapping antibiotic-resistance genes through mobile pieces of circular DNA called plasmids, and this exchange may be contributing to the alarming rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals. To understand how these plasmids move between bacterial species in a hospital setting, Karen Frank, Tara Palmore, Julie Segre and colleagues spent two years taking environmental samples and surveillance cultures from over one thousand patients at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Over this two-year period they identified 10 patients who harbored carbapenem-resistant bacteria. Using a relatively new technology called long-read genome sequencing to decode and compare plasmid genomes, the NIH team discovered that plasmid-carrying bacteria are exchanging antibiotic-resistant genes in the biofilms of sink drains. However, they do not have any evidence of transfer of bacteria from the sink to any of the patients. The authors note that patients who carry the bacteria may not be sick, but can still pass carbapenem-resistant bacteria onto others. The study offers evidence that plasmid transfer in healthcare settings is likely aiding the increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria.



Great to Know!!!

Great to Know! Go Statistics…

Study questions 21-day quarantine period for Ebola

As medical personnel and public health officials are responding to the first reported cases of Ebola Virus in the United States, many of the safety and treatment procedures for treating the virus and preventing its spread are being reexamined. One of the tenets for minimizing the risk of spreading the disease has been a 21-day quarantine period for individuals who might have been exposed to the virus. But a new study by Charles Haas, PhD, a professor in Drexel’s College of Engineering, suggests that 21 days might not be enough to completely prevent spread of the virus.

Haas’s study “On the Quarantine Period for Ebola Virus,” recently published in PLOS Currents: Outbreaks looks at the murky basis for our knowledge about the virus, namely previous outbreaks in Africa in 1976 (Zaire) and 2000 (Uganda) as well as the first 9 months of the current outbreak.

Chlamydia Treatment: STD Fact

Chlamydia Treatment Often Difficult Due To Pathogen’s Resilience; Scientists Trace STD’s Evolutionary Pattern

Anyone who has suffered from the sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacterium chlamydia would know how difficult it is to get it diagnosed and treated. It is the most widespread form of STD in the U.S. today, and experts agree that identifying the exact phenotype of the bacterium is a huge step toward developing therapeutics targeting it. After years of exploring the genetic evolution of the bacterium, researchers from the University of Vienna finally discovered the secret behind the pathogen’s resilience: recombinations.

A street cat named bob















"One day in the subway, James saw a red cat with a wound to the leg that likely resulted from a fight with another cat. It was obvious that the cat needed help. James could not pass and took the cat to the vet. With a little medical treatment and prescription drugs, the cat quickly recovered. At that point, James found it impossible to say goodbye to Street Cat Bob. Bob followed James everywhere he went. As James played the guitar on the street and Bob sat nearby, revenues increased dramatically. People found it difficult to pass when they looked at the cute kitty. James went on to write a book describing their adventures in the street which was full of life – both dramatic and comedic. In the book, James says that he could not have imagined how meeting Bob would change his life. His friendship with the cat healed him from a life that had been very hard. Most likely, if Bob could speak, he would say the same thing.”

Ultra Fact

Movement is the key to staying alert and maintaining focus, according to several studies. The elementary found that their students who spent more time in the Read and Ride program achieved higher proficiency in reading while students who spent the least amount of time in the program had significantly lower scores. This is also a better alternative to desks because continuous sitting can lead to chronic pain, obesity, decreased productivity, poor posture and other various health issues.
Sea Sapphire



Sapphirina copepod, a.k.a. "sea sapphire" is a tiny shrimp like crustacean that makes up the bottom of the food chain. The microscopic layers of crystal plates inside their cells catch light and reflect back different hues, from bright gold to deep blue that resembles like a gem. 

When they’re abundant near the water’s surface the sea shimmers like diamonds falling from the sky. Japanese name this kind of water, “tama-mizu”, jeweled water. Combine this nifty trick with the sea sapphire’s impressively transparent body, and you have an animal as radiant as a star in one moment, and invisible in the next.

Awesome Truck




Man hires hitman to kill his wife

Susan Kuhnhausen arrived home on the evening of Sept. 6 to find a hit- man coming at her with a claw hammer.

She was struck in the head and wrested the weapon away, but the struggle continued & the hit-man bit her. According to police, she was eventually able to get the him into a choke hold and police later found him dead in a hallway. An autopsy revealed the cause of death was strangulation.



Arizona Biker Gang helps child abuse victims

These dudes are fucking legit.  They don’t just show up one day in court, either, they actually make friends with the kids and let them know they have a support system and that there are people in the world who care about them and will always have their back.  And less important, but also cool, is that the few times a couple of them have come into my cafe, they’ve been super friendly and polite and when I told one of the guys that I noticed his Bikers Against Child Abuse patch and wanted him to know how awesome I thought he was because of it, he got kind of shy and blushed and said, “The kids are the awesome ones, we just let them know they’re allowed to be brave.”

“BACA Mission Statement

Bikers Against Child Abuse (BACA) exists with the intent to create a safer environment for abused children. We exist as a body of Bikers to empower children to not feel afraid of the world in which they live. We stand ready to lend support to our wounded friends by involving them with an established, united organization. We work in conjunction with local and state officials who are already in place to protect children. We desire to send a clear message to all involved with the abused child that this child is part of our organization, and that we are prepared to lend our physical and emotional support to them by affiliation, and our physical presence. We stand at the ready to shield these children from further abuse. We do not condone the use of violence or physical force in any manner, however, if circumstances arise such that we are the only obstacle preventing a child from further abuse, we stand ready to be that obstacle.”

During one court day, the judge asked the boy, “Are you afraid?” No, the boy said.

The judge seemed surprised, and asked, “Why not?”

The boy glanced at the bikers sitting in the front row, two more standing on each side of the courtroom door, and told the judge, “Because my friends are scarier than he is.”


Liquid salts treat skin infections

Liquid salts by-pass skin to treat infection (Nature News)
Liquid salts can improve the treatment of skin infections by killing bacteria and enhancing antibiotics’ ability to penetrate the skin’s outer layer, a new study finds.
A team led by Samir Mitragotri, a chemical engineer at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has demonstrated this strategy in principle in a study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences1.

After tests for skin toxicity and irritation, one ionic liquid — choline geranate — emerged as a multipurpose vehicle, showing antimicrobial activity, minimal toxicity and enhanced delivery of the broad-spectrum antibiotic cefadroxil.

The researchers then tested the effectiveness of choline geranate as an antibiotic-delivery vehicle in an in vitro skin model that was wounded and infected with biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Less than 5% of the bacteria survived when the antibiotic ceftazidime was paired with choline geranate, compared with 80% when the antibiotic was used on its own.

Narrownose Chimaera



The Narrownose chimaera (Harriotta raleighana), occurs in deep waters of the continental slopes in depths of 380 to 2,600 m in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.  They are oviparous but nothing is known of spawning and reproduction and very few juveniles have been collected. It was filmed swimming 10 m above the seafloor in Hydrographer Canyon, off the coast of Nantucket Island in the US.

Extreme home






Blood Testing for Ebola

Blood Test For Ebola Doesn’t Catch Infection Early (NPR)

In an ideal world, health care workers returning from West Africa would get a quick blood test to prove they aren’t carrying the Ebola virus. A test like that would likely put to rest some of the anxiety surrounding these doctors, nurses and scientists.

Unfortunately, even the best blood test in the world can’t do that.

The test uses a technology called PCR, for polymerase chain reaction. It can detect extraordinarily small traces of genetic material from the Ebola virus.

But the catch is, the test is usually used on blood samples. And in the beginning, that’s not where the Ebola virus hides.

"The initial sites of replication actually are not in the blood itself — they’re mostly in tissues like spleen or liver," says Thomas Geisbert, a microbiologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.

Magnified 25,000 times, this digitally colorized scanning electron micrograph shows Ebola virus particles (green) budding from an infected cell (blue).

Scientists grow human stomachs

Scientists grow tiny human stomachs in lab dishes (Science Shot) By

The colorful snakelike image above is actually fluorescently labeled tissue from a section of a stomach that’s smaller than a pea. But it’s not the stomach of an extraordinarily small animal; it’s a mini human stomach grown in a dish by scientists who hope to use it to study gastrointestinal diseases. Because the digestive systems of mice, flies, and other model organisms differ from those of humans, researchers have been hard-pressed to find a way to study the development of human gut maladies such as peptic ulcer disease. So several groups have turned to pluripotent stem cells—cells derived from human embryos or reprogrammed adult cells that can turn into any cell type in the body—to try to grow digestive organs in the lab. Last week, one group of researchers announced the creation of a lab-grown small intestine from stem cells. Today, a different team reports online in Nature that they’ve perfected the recipe of molecules needed to coax both types of stem cells to grow into small spheres that, despite their size, have all the properties of a functional stomach. When the researchers exposed the ministomachs to the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, infections of which are blamed for many stomach ulcers and cancers, they saw the same molecular and cellular changes already known to occur in life-size stomachs.

Ultra Facts






Sugar Gliders
This is why you should always love your sugar glider!



They do need a good amount of interaction (even if it is just riding around in a pocket all day). If they get very lonely, they can get depressed and go on a hunger strike, dying of starvation.

Western Europes tallest building



Designed by Master Architect Renzo Piano,  is Western Europe’s tallest building and is the only place where visitors can see the whole of London at once.

Today is a gift







You are too concerned with what was and what will be.
Piano Projections help you play a tune









Piano projections help you play a tune
Sleep boosts brain cell numbers

Sleep ‘boosts brain cell numbers’

Scientists believe they have discovered a new reason why we need to sleep - it replenishes a type of brain cell. Sleep ramps up the production of cells that go on to make an insulating material known as myelin which protects our brain’s circuitry. The findings, so far in mice, could lead to insights about sleep’s role in brain repair and growth as well as the disease MS, says the Wisconsin team. The work is in the Journal of Neuroscience. Dr Chiara Cirelli and colleagues from the University of Wisconsin found that the production rate of the myelin making cells, immature oligodendrocytes, doubled as mice slept. The increase was most marked during the type of sleep that is associated with dreaming - REM or rapid eye movement sleep - and was driven by genes. In contrast, the genes involved in cell death and stress responses were turned on when the mice were forced to stay awake. Precisely why we need to sleep has baffled scientists for centuries. It’s obvious that we need to sleep to feel rested and for our mind to function well - but the biological processes that go on as we slumber have only started to be uncovered relatively recently. 

Vaccine-resistant polio strain discovered

Vaccine-resistant polio strain discovered

Outbreaks of polio are still occurring today, such as the ones in the Republic of the Congo in 2010, Tajikistan in 2010, and China in 2011. The epidemic outbreak in 2010 in the Republic of the Congo differed from the others in its exceptionally high mortality rate of 47%: out of the 445 confirmed cases, nearly 210 died. Researchers first attributed the seriousness of the epidemic to low vaccine coverage.In reality, the cause was something completely different.

An international team including IRD researchers has just identified the virus responsible and sequenced its genetic material. The genetic sequence shows two mutations, unknown until now, of the proteins that form the “shell” (capsid) of the virus. On the face of it, this evolution complicates the task for the antibodies produced by the immune system of the vaccinated patient as they can no longer recognize the viral strain.

"Smart bomb" new antibiotic

A new antibiotic ‘smart bomb’ has been developed that can target specific strains of bacteria

A new wave of antibiotics has been developed which are able to target, and destroy specific strains of bacteria, leaving other strains in peace.

The team at North Carolina state university have exploited the bacterial immune system known as CRISPR-Cas system which is present in many bacteria. This system protects the bacterium from invading plasmids and DNA from viruses by creating complimentary of sRNA referred to as CRISPR RNA. When they match, Cas proteins are able to degrade these fragments and prevent infection. 

The team created CRISPR RNAs to target bacterial DNA itself, causing the CRISPR-Cas system to attack the cell’s own DNA causing bacterial suicide. In the lab, this has removed the target bacteria from other species, but at this stage the mechanism is so far unclear.

Albino Raven

I met this albino Raven named Pearl today at Bird Fest. It is only one of four known albino Ravens in the whole world.

Pearl lives in this woman’s house. The handler has a permit, and the bird is property of the government (like hawks and falcons). She is affiliated with the California Wildlife Center. Every time the handler stopped petting Pearl she started cawing. She really likes affection.

















This awesome arboreal dwelling is the Livi

This awesome arboreal dwelling is the Living the High Life Tree House created by Blue Forest, a British tree house design and construction firm. It’s a luxury family-sized complex featuring two separate tree houses, one for kids and one for their parents. The elevated dwellings are connected by a network of rope bridges which also lead to an adventure play area and an assault course, the latter of which is also accessible via an 80-yard zip line.

It may look rustic, but this is a top-of-the-line tree house. The kids’ house features three medieval towers, and inside one of them a concealed hatch in the upper floor leads to a secret game room containing a plasma TV and video game console. Meanwhile the grown-ups’ treehouse features a conical thatched roof and interior walls made of hand-split oak shingles and cedar tongue-and-groove boards. Inside there’s a kitchen (complete with plenty of wine storage), bathroom, and a large open living area for treetop entertaining. The complex also features accommodations for guests of the family.

Head over to the Blue Forest website to check out more of their amazing custom-built tree houses.

ng the High Life Tree House created by Blue Forest, a British tree house design and construction firm. It’s a luxury family-sized complex featuring two separate tree houses, one for kids and one for their parents. The elevated dwellings are connected by a network of rope bridges which also lead to an adventure play area and an assault course, the latter of which is also accessible via an 80-yard zip line.

It may look rustic, but this is a top-of-the-line tree house. The kids’ house features three medieval towers, and inside one of them a concealed hatch in the upper floor leads to a secret game room containing a plasma TV and video game console. Meanwhile the grown-ups’ treehouse features a conical thatched roof and interior walls made of hand-split oak shingles and cedar tongue-and-groove boards. Inside there’s a kitchen (complete with plenty of wine storage), bathroom, and a large open living area for treetop entertaining. The complex also features accommodations for guests of the family.





New knowledge about human brain’s plasticity

The brain’s plasticity and its adaptability to new situations do not function the way researchers previously thought, according to a new study published in the journal Cell. Earlier theories are based on laboratory animals, but now researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the human brain. The results show that a type of support cell, the oligodendrocyte, which plays an important role in the cell-cell communication in the nervous system, is more sophisticated in humans than in rats and mice — a fact that may contribute to the superior plasticity of the human brain.

The learning process takes place partly by nerve cells creating new connections in the brain. Our nerve cells are therefore crucial for how we store new knowledge. But it is also important that nerve impulses travel at high speed and a special material called myelin plays a vital role. Myelin acts as an insulating layer around nerve fibres, the axons, and large quantities of myelin speed up the nerve impulses and improve function. When we learn something new, myelin production increases in the part of the brain where learning occurs. This interplay, where the brain’s development is shaped by the demands that are imposed on it, is what we know today as the brain’s plasticity.





New knowledge about human brain’s plasticity

The brain’s plasticity and its adaptability to new situations do not function the way researchers previously thought, according to a new study published in the journal Cell. Earlier theories are based on laboratory animals, but now researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the human brain. The results show that a type of support cell, the oligodendrocyte, which plays an important role in the cell-cell communication in the nervous system, is more sophisticated in humans than in rats and mice — a fact that may contribute to the superior plasticity of the human brain.

The learning process takes place partly by nerve cells creating new connections in the brain. Our nerve cells are therefore crucial for how we store new knowledge. But it is also important that nerve impulses travel at high speed and a special material called myelin plays a vital role. Myelin acts as an insulating layer around nerve fibres, the axons, and large quantities of myelin speed up the nerve impulses and improve function. When we learn something new, myelin production increases in the part of the brain where learning occurs. This interplay, where the brain’s development is shaped by the demands that are imposed on it, is what we know today as the brain’s plasticity.





New knowledge about human brain’s plasticity

The brain’s plasticity and its adaptability to new situations do not function the way researchers previously thought, according to a new study published in the journal Cell. Earlier theories are based on laboratory animals, but now researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the human brain. The results show that a type of support cell, the oligodendrocyte, which plays an important role in the cell-cell communication in the nervous system, is more sophisticated in humans than in rats and mice — a fact that may contribute to the superior plasticity of the human brain.

The learning process takes place partly by nerve cells creating new connections in the brain. Our nerve cells are therefore crucial for how we store new knowledge. But it is also important that nerve impulses travel at high speed and a special material called myelin plays a vital role. Myelin acts as an insulating layer around nerve fibres, the axons, and large quantities of myelin speed up the nerve impulses and improve function. When we learn something new, myelin production increases in the part of the brain where learning occurs. This interplay, where the brain’s development is shaped by the demands that are imposed on it, is what we know today as the brain’s plasticity.







It’s also much cheaper to stay overnight in one of these than a hotel. Many offer private rooms with comfortable reclining chairs & some even offer sofas and beds





Gut–brain link grabs neuroscientists (Nature News)

Companies selling ‘probiotic’ foods have long claimed that cultivating the right gut bacteria can benefit mental well-being, but neuroscientists have generally been sceptical. Now there is hard evidence linking conditions such as autism and depression to the gut’s microbial residents, known as the microbiome. And neuroscientists are taking notice — not just of the clinical implications but also of what the link could mean for experimental design.

“The field is going to another level of sophistication,” says Sarkis Mazmanian, a microbiologist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. “Hopefully this will shift this image that there’s too much commercial interest and data from too few labs.














Daan Roosegaarde's glowing  Van Gogh cycle path to open in the Netherlands

"It’s a new total system that is self-sufficient and practical, and just incredibly poetic," said Roosegaarde.


Dutch designer
Daan Roosegaarde' s cycle path, illuminated with patterns based on Vincent Van Gogh's painting The Starry Night, officially opens in Nuenen this evening .

The surface of the Van Gogh-Roosegaarde Bicycle Path is coated with a special paint that uses energy gathered during the day to glow after dark. Forming part of the Van Gogh cycle route through the Dutch province of Noord Brabant, where the artist was born and raised, the kilometre-long section of path illuminates in swirling patterns that reference his 1889 painting of a night-time scene

.A nearby solar panel is used to generate power to illuminate the coated surface, which was developed with infrastructure firm Heijmans. LEDs along the side of certain curves in the path cast extra light, meaning the path will still be partially lit if the weather has been too cloudy for the panel to charge the surface to its full brightness.





World-first evidence suggests that meditation alters cancer survivors’ cells

For the first time, scientists have found clear biological evidence that meditation and support groups can affect us on a cellular level.

We’re often told that being happy, meditating and mindfulness can benefit our health. We all have that one friend of a friend who says they cured their terminal illness by quitting their job and taking up surfing - but until now there’s been very little scientific evidence to back up these claims.

Now researchers in Canada have found the first evidence to suggest that support groups that encourage meditation and yoga can actually alter the cellular activity of cancer survivors.

Their study, which was published in the journal Cancer last week, is one of the first to suggest that a mind-body connection really does exist. 

The team found that the telomeres - the protein caps at the end of our chromosomes that determine how quickly a cell ages - stayed the same length in cancer survivors who meditated or took part in support groups over a three-month period.

On the other hand, the telomeres of cancer survivors who didn’t participate in these groups shortened during the three-month study.

Scientists still don’t know for sure whether telomeres are involved in regulating disease, but there is early evidence that suggests shortened telomeres are associated with the likelihood of surviving several diseases, including breast cancer, as well as cellular ageing. And longer telomeres are generally thought to help protect us from disease.

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